Publications

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

Growing Up in a Cult: An Interview

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What is a Cult?

When people think of cults the Jim Jones incident of the 70s comes to mind. He laced Kool-Aid with cyanide and convinced his followers to commit a mass-suicide. But cults are a lot more common than that.

Cults usually have several defining characteristics. These are:

  • Members display zealous and unquestioning loyalty to a central leader, whether alive or dead, and follow his beliefs and ideas religiously.
  • Questioning, doubt, and other forms of dissent are discouraged and sometimes punished.
  • Meditation, speaking in tongues, and other mind-altering practices are used to expel doubts about the group and its leaders.
  • The leaders determine how members should think, act, and feel. This could be controlling which jobs or schools members should go to, who people should marry, and other personal life practices.
  • The group is elitist.
  • The group has an “us versus them” mentality and message.
  • The leader isn’t accountable to authorities in society today.
  • The group has a mentality of “the ends justify the means” that often results in lying to family members or collecting money for bogus charities and other ethically questionable behavior.
  • Peer pressure and other methods are used to control members with feelings of shame or guilt.
  • Members are often encouraged to cut ties with family or friends to make them dependent on the group for all of their social needs.
  • Recruitment of new members is a top priority.
  • Making money is also a top priority.
  • Members are expected to focus the majority of their time on the activities the group holds, regardless of previous obligations.
  • The most zealous members are completely dependent on the group and can’t imagine a life without it.

This list is paraphrased from this website.

Interview with Ripley

One of my friends, Ripley, allowed me to interview her about a religious cult she grew up in.

What was it like growing up in a cult? Specifically, before you noticed something was amiss?

It was nothing odd because it was all I knew. All my friends and their families did it so it was normal for me. I went to a small school within the church. All of my friends were a part of it. When I was young, I had church once every week. Then, in middle school, I had events several times per week. It was normal for me because of what I’d seen with others. It was really apparent something was off once I started opening my eyes, though.

When did you start to notice something was wrong? Was there a certain moment you realized? 

Probably in the fourth grade. We were in Bible class at school and I started asking questions. The teacher shamed me, basically giving the impression to me and the other kids that asking questions wasn’t okay.

Another time, in middle school, my mother was struggling to pay tuition to keep me in the church’s private school. I almost had to go to public school, which I had been excited about. All of a sudden the money appeared. It turns out everyone had offered to help pay so I could stay. That struck me as odd.

Then, in high school, I had to go to public school. I was able to evangelize to my classmates at that point. They moved me from a middle school bible study group to a high school group early. It was almost like training me. In high school, we had even more meetings for the church. We had meetings three or four times per week.

What kinds of things did you notice were wrong with their teachings or attitudes?

It wasn’t very loving. It was very instructional. Religion shouldn’t be taught as if it has a handbook. It was like, “Here’s how to share your faith. Here’s how to share how God changed your life.”

They sent us to a retreat in the 8th grade to groom us on these things. They made us [Read More]

 

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Publications on Functionally Fictional, Writing

A Book to Read for Sarcasm Month: “Frat Girl” by Kiley Roache

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“Frat Girl” by Kiley Roache is a chick-lit book about a rebel. Cassie Miller is a girl who has aspirations to go off to her dream college in California. In order to do that, she needs to get a scholarship. The one she’s applied for needs her to propose a research project that relates to her major.

She’s a women’s gender studies major, so she proposes a project to join her father’s frat as a legacy. The frat has been in trouble for misogynist posters during a party. She proposes to expose the frat for its terrible behavior and disband the frat once and for all.

At first, things are going as planned. She wins the scholarship, rushes the fraternity, and survives all of the pledge tasks. She writes journal entries detailing their despicable behavior. But then things start to change.

Her frat brothers become [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

Finding Time To Write

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All of us have busy lives. Full-time jobs, family, and school are some common ones, but there are many more. How can we find the time to write when we have so much going on in our lives?

Track How You Spend Your Time

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The first step is to track how you spend your time. Take a week to record every activity you do during the day and the approximate time of day you do them.

For example, mine would look something like this:

  • 8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Wake Up/Morning Routine/Breakfast
  • 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Social Media
  • 10:00 a.m. – 11 a.m. Writing Time
  • 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Homework for School
  • 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch
  • 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Writing Time/Reading/Appointments
  • 2:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Social Media/Free Time
  • 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Cook/Family Dinner/Wash Dishes
  • 6:00 p.m. -7:30 p.m. Meetings for Groups
  • 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Wind Down/Bedtime Routine/Reading
  • 9:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Try to Fall Asleep

This works for me because I need plenty of time to fall asleep because of my insomnia. I don’t have many responsibilities, either. Yours may look different.

You may ask why I am qualified to help you find time to write if I have no responsibilities. I’ve worked, gone to school, and finished the first draft of a novel at the same time.

This exercise is about tracking how you spend your time. Don’t judge what you are doing. Just record what you do and when.

Find Potential Writing Time

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Now that you have a week’s worth of records, the next step is [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

Romance Writing: Creating Characters Who Are Meant To Be Together

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As an avid reader of romance, I have read numerous novels where the hero and heroine fall in love for no reason. It simply serves the plot. This is not what we want as readers. We want characters that fall in love because they are meant for each other. They have to be perfectly matched and have complementary traits. For most writers, this is hard to achieve. However, the solution to this problem is simple.

Character Creation is Key

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If you don’t spend time getting to know your characters before you start writing, it is a lot harder to achieve the kind of relationship readers want. Writing before you know your characters requires a lot of editing to get their relationship to where it needs to be.

Trying to fit characters to a plot has the same hindering effect. The choices characters make in a given situation are because of their personalities. It is a lot harder to fit a character’s personality to actions instead of figuring out what a character would do based on who they are.

Build One Character at a Time

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By focusing on one character at a time, you are better able to [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

Five Truths of Editing Fiction No One Tells You

Red Pen for Editing
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This is my latest on Coffee House Writers. You can find the full article here.

Five Truths of Editing Fiction No One Tells You

I’ve been chronicling my experience with editing here at Coffee House Writers with some of my past articles. “Starting Over: Mirroring Kristin Cashore’s Writing of Bitterblue” was about how rewriting the whole story was my original plan. “An Editing Process for Pantsers” mentioned a very analytical way of evaluating each scene and figuring out whether it was worth keeping.

I have been indecisive about how to edit, to say the least. This is, in part, because of the editing everyone talks about versus what it will actually look like.

We need an honest conversation about what the editing process entails.

When someone says the word “editing,” what do you see? A red pen fixing punctuation errors, awkward wording and grammar? That’s what I imagined. I didn’t realize one of the biggest secrets of editing: editing is, at its heart, rewriting.

Because of the common misconceptions about writing, I decided to list out the truths of editing. I stumbled across these through editing my novel.

Truth #1: Editing is Rewriting

In truth, everything after the first draft is editing. You must rewrite scenes, add scenes, delete scenes, and everything in between to get to the polished-draft phase. Everything you write after the first completed draft is editing, even if you are writing a completely new sequence of scenes for the first half of your book.

Truth #2: You Will Cut 90 Percent Of Your First Draft

I wrote 61,000 words for my first draft. The first 42,000 words will be completely rewritten. Some of the later scenes [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

The Heroine of My Life: A Therapy Exercise for Battling Negative Self-Talk

Success is being the hero of your life
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This is my latest on Coffee House Writers. I had the inspiration to write this from a friend who mentioned that her therapist had told her about this exercise. I was immediately taken with the idea and wanted to see if it could help me. This is what I came up with since I didn’t want to make an autobiography out of it. You can read the full article here. I hope you enjoy!

The Heroine of My Life:

** Trigger Warning** Mentions of Suicidal Thoughts and Bullying

Someone suggested as a therapy exercise to write my story. However, there was a simple requirement. I had to make myself the strong heroine with a happy ending instead of playing the victim. It’s an exercise to battle negative self-image and self-talk.

Here’s my story:

As a young child, I already had a stubborn personality. I liked to call it determination. My mother and I often butted heads because of this personality trait. It was something she called a battle of wills.

Traits of kindness, loyalty and caring for others appeared. I had a strong sense of justice and always helped others. I love helping my friends figure out their problems.

I was a take-charge kind of person. If I had an idea, I was passionate about; it would consume me to the point of obsession. I would work on the project until I couldn’t work on it anymore. I would stop after exhausting the possibilities or resistance from others.

But, as is always the case with young, strong-willed creatives, it put me through trial after trial of resistance.

I was creative; I was always writing fiction and reading whatever I could get my hands on. When eating, I read cereal boxes or labels on food containers to keep my mind occupied.

I was intelligent. My mind was always thinking. I would evaluate problems and ways to solve them. I sought to understand the world around me, why people thought and acted the way they did. I often wondered why I thought and acted the way I did. Understanding how and why things worked was critical for me. My endless questions of “why” often irritated my parents. They often told me to look answers up in the ancient encyclopedia we had or, later,  [Read More]

 

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

An Editing Process for Pantsers

Editing Process
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This is another article that I wrote for Coffee House Writers. You can find the full article with this link. I hope you find this helpful!

An Editing Process for Pantsers

The 18th of July was the one-month anniversary of finishing my first full-length novel. You may have seen my article “Starting Over: Mirroring Kristin Cashore’s Process Of Writing Bitterblue,” published earlier this month about the process I was planning on using to edit the novel.

Well, plans have changed. I admit I’ve never edited a longer piece of writing before. The editing process is a bit of a mystery to me.

I have read lots of articles about how to approach editing, but few seemed to lend themselves to the way my brain works. Being a panster, a term for someone who doesn’t plot or plan before writing, means a lot of methods for editing aren’t aimed towards your process. Plus, a lot of these methods didn’t tell me how to approach each step. They just gave a basic rundown of the process involved without going into detail.

I ended up cobbling several methods together to get what I think I need for this specific project. I have a general idea of what it needs to improve.

What methods did I choose to include in the editing process?

First off, I wanted to read through and separate the scenes. I placed a hashtag between each of the scenes. Then, I filled out an index card with a couple of questions. These questions were:

  • Who is in the scene? I wrote down the names of each character that makes an appearance. I made a note if they only appear for a portion or leave in the middle of the scene.
  • What happens? I made a short synopsis of the events in the scene.
  • When does it happen? This has three parts to it.
    • I included the day number during the timeline of the novel (Day 1, Day 2, etc.,).
    • The time of day the scene happens (early morning, morning, early afternoon, afternoon, evening, night, late night,).
    • And the day of the week (Sunday, Monday, etc.).
  • What is the POV Character’s Goal? What are they trying to accomplish? Do they [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Functionally Fictional, Writing

Review of “The Vampire Diaries: The Awakening” by L.J. Smith

Vampire Diaries Cover
Photo courtesy of Amazon

This is my second review this month on Functionally Fictional. You can find the full review here. I hope you enjoy!

Review of “The Vampire Diaries: The Awakening” by L.J. Smith

This book has dark themes but is intriguing and a great story. It is a short read, and ends with a cliffhanger (as most series do), but is worth reading. The writing style is unique.

Detailing the beginning of the story of Elena, a high school queen bee, and Stefan, a vampire who is new to town, this story has a lot of twists and turns and is very different from the TV series.

Elena is intrigued by the new boy in her high school who is clearly well off. She pursues him and is thwarted at every turn. Odd things start to happen when he comes into town; mysterious [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Functionally Fictional, Writing

My Review of “Fallen Too Far” by Abbi Glines

Fallen Too Far by Abbi Glines Cover
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This is my latest review on Functionally Fiction. As always, you can read the full article here.

Review of “Fallen Too Far” by Abbi Glines

This book is a spicy romance that made me want to read a lot more of her work. I was introduced to Abbi’s work through her book Until Friday Night which I wrote a review for. It was a fairly good YA book that I enjoyed.

However, it doesn’t hold a candle to her adult books! Spicy love scenes and relationships that are addictive grace her books, I am finding.

This book tells the story of Blaire, a nineteen year old who has experienced her fair share of trauma. Looking for a place to stay, she contacts her estranged father, who sends her to Rosemary Beach where she meets [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

Character Creation: Why Is It Important And How Can You Do It?

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There are two main parts to every story: internal and external conflict. These are also known as character and plot, respectively.

One of the age-old debates in the literary world is which is more important to the story. Neuroscience has answered this question with fMRI technology. According to Lisa Cron’s book, “Story Genius,” the character’s journey is more important. Why?

It’s how our brains process the story. On page 109 of “Story Genius,” Cron writes, “Cognitive psychologist and novelist Keith Oatley… defines fiction as ‘a simulation that runs on the software of our minds.” We use stories as a way to evaluate different social situations and how we would react to them. Basically, it allows us to experience the situation and reap the chemical rewards of navigating it successfully without ever being in the situation for ourselves.

Your character’s journey to change is what makes the story compelling to readers.

You need to relate to the character on some level. Our brains are wired to relate to the character, not the plot. If the character is not relatable, then the reader stops reading.

That begs the question: how can you create a relatable character and make the story compelling?

First, by understanding a few key points:

[Read More]

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

Starting Over: Mirroring Kristin Cashore’s Process of Writing “Bitterblue”

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I am a fan of the “Graceling Realm Series” by Kristin Cashore. In the back of the third and final book, “Bitterblue,” I found a mention of the blog post that detailed how she ended up restarting the writing process for that book all over again.

Imagine having written seven notebooks, all filled with the first draft, the equivalent of 800 pages of a typed manuscript only to be told to “start over” by your editor. Infuriating right?

Well, Cashore agreed with her editor after some thought. And when she sat down to write it, she wrote a much better, more concise manuscript.

Of course, in order to get the motivation to write, she had to trick her brain. She had to use tricks to tell herself she was writing a brand-new book. She had to use other tricks to show herself she was making progress and not just floundering.

I recently went through a similar experience. Although I wrote nowhere near 800 plus pages of a manuscript (more like 200 pages and 61,000 words), I felt overwhelmed with the prospect of editing the novel I had written.

It is the longest manuscript I have written to date, and the whole vision of it changed around 40,000 words in. Not to mention that 90 percent of the plot points happen in the last 20,000 words.

Simply put, [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

An Open Letter to My Younger Self

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Dear Younger Self,

You will be on a journey of learning your whole life. Along the way, there will be tears, great friends, betrayal, suicidal thoughts, and support. You will go through a lot of hard times, but the good times will make the hard times worth it.
You will be an energetic, stubborn, bossy child with advanced social skills and an affinity for writing. For you writing is an extension of playing pretend. It is fun and exciting to create a world all your own. Music and the life you observe and the worlds you experience from reading will inspire you.
Your parents have their faults but have redeeming qualities, too. You will think they are perfect and will have a hard time coming to terms with the fact they will be toxic for you later in life. They will play favorites and treat your brother better with more support later in your life. You will be on medicine from a young age.
You will experience a psychiatric unit and suicidal thoughts induced by medicine when you are just ten years old. You will come out learning of things like cutting and burning. You will be exposed to a world you shouldn’t have at your age. The next year your aunt will die from suicide. This will be hard to see your family so broken about it. You will feel guilty because you don’t cry. You will grieve your way, and that is okay. This event will save your life many times later in your life when you continue to have suicidal thoughts for yourself.

[Read More]

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

Big Dream: Exploring My Deep-Seated Fears

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I had been thinking about a challenge. A challenge to identify my fears as they relate to my Big Dream from Debbie Burns book “The Path to Courage.” A Big Dream is the thing I want to do with the rest of my life to fulfill my calling. I had been thinking all day but had written nothing down. I wrote my Big Dream and all the fears and societal and cultural rules that were stopping me. For reference, my Big Dream is to support myself through writing and writing-related jobs. I don’t want to get stuck in an unfulfilling job and feel miserable. I noticed that a lot of my fears had to do with financial independence and autonomy.

It came to me; I am scared to depend on anyone but myself. I am scared of the rejection and the hurt that comes from trusting someone. I am afraid of having them disappoint or betray me. I am so frightened of trusting others, asking for help, and allowing myself to love.

Looking back on my childhood, this makes sense. From a young age, I was independent. My brother has autism and glaring behavior problems and has my parents’ attention. They praised me for being an “easy, independent” child. When I needed help, they told me too, “figure it out on my own.” I felt betrayed because my brother was getting all the help and attention he needed.

This pattern with my parents’ attention hasn’t changed in 21 years. I still don’t get help from them, even now when I need it more than my brother. He gets a lot more help than he needs. They hold me to higher standards than my brother. I am expected to be autonomous at 21 despite my severe mental illness.

To illustrate this: [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

How 10 Months With My Grandma Taught Me More Than 20 Years With My Parents

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In my last article, An Open Letter To My Mom, I mentioned how my grandma had helped me. I thought I would elaborate.

The Move

On August 2017, Grandma heard Mom was having trouble with me. Mom had told her and the rest of the family about our problems. Despite this knowledge, she offered to let me live with her for the foreseeable future. For this, I owe her my life.

In the previous three months, I got kicked out of my grandparents’ house and my parents’ house for the second time. I thought I had used up all my family favors and would have to strike out on my own. This was something I was not ready for.

My mental illness is severe enough to make cashiering and food service jobs stressful enough to land me in the hospital. I was not qualified for any other job. Therefore, striking out on my own was impossible. Not to mention I couldn’t handle school and a job at the same time.

So, when Grandma offered to take me in, I saw it as a Godsend. I was determined not to mess it up.

The Rules

I felt nervous and excited when I arrived from the airport. From the get-go, Grandma stated the ground rules. First, always be honest. When you have a problem with something someone else in the house is doing, say something. Second, everyone contributes. You can cook dinner, wash dishes, clean, vacuum, anything as long as you contribute. No one will nag you to do things. You must do them of your volition. Third, we help and support each other. If you need something, tell the household what it is and how they can help. [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Functionally Fictional, Writing

Hayley’s Review of “Fire Up Your Writing Brain” by Susan Reynolds

This is my latest review on Functionally Fictional!

Functionally Fictional

By: Hayley Green

This book combines two of my favorite subjects: neuroscience and writing. Some of it can be hard to understand due to use of the proper terms for things, but overall it did a nice job of explaining things in a way that it could be understood and how it applies to writers.

Find the book here!

It takes you through the whole process of writing throughout the book: the idea, planning, writing, and editing. It gives you proven ways to train your brain at each stage to be more productive and keep up brain health. It promotes finding what works for you and how your brain works.

The most lengthy stage of the book is the writing stage. It tells you how to craft a story in the beginning chapters, gain motivation or dedication to work through the middle, how to have the courage to end your…

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Why You Won’t Get A Mother’s Day Card: An Open Letter To My Mom

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Hello, Mom.

I wanted to let you know you won’t be getting a card this year for Mother’s Day. There are plenty of reasons. Here are a few.

You play favorites with my brother and me. He has been and always will be your favorite. I don’t know why this is, but it hurts. When I need help, you brush me off and tell me to figure it out on my own. I am only twenty-one and I am now finding my footing in the real world. It’s unrealistic to expect me to not need help with housing or money at this age. My brother is the same age, and when he needs help you rush to his aide. You justify this by saying we’re different people and need different things. But I have a severe mental illness: schizoaffective disorder, bipolar, and anxiety. Every second of every day I hear voices that feel real but aren’t. I can’t go out in public without fearing a mental breakdown and panic attack. My brother has a high functioning form of autism. His symptoms are trouble focusing and reading body language. I have always envied my brother because of the special treatment and extra love and help that he got.

I remember the time he had an internship at a local radio station. He had to be at the internship at ten in the morning and both you and Dad were working. You asked me to drive him. I said no because I was in a bout of depression and had been sleeping until one or two in the afternoon. I couldn’t deal with you picking fights all day and couldn’t force myself to get up and do the things I needed to do. Thinking about getting out of bed and having to face the world exhausted me. I didn’t have the mental or physical energy to deal with anyone or anything. Sleeping was my way of coping. You should understand. You slept through almost every afternoon due to your depression. We weren’t allowed to bother you when you slept 36 hours. When you asked me to drive him, I didn’t want to make a promise I couldn’t keep. But you didn’t understand. Instead, you retaliated by telling me that having a car and a license was a privilege and that I could take the bus. When I asked why my brother couldn’t take the bus your exact words were, “End of conversation.” [Read More].

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

Is A College Education Right For You?

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The Millennial generation and every generation after them are being encouraged to get a college degree. However, the cost of college tuition and materials has gone up exponentially while wages remain about the same. Many people of the older generation say how they paid their way through college working a minimum wage job. If you do the calculations, they look something like this:

College
Photo by Into Mathematics And Bondage / imgur.com

As you can see, things have changed a lot. The argument, “I did it, you can too,” is not valid. And people are getting thousands of dollars in debt, if not hundreds of thousands if you add in graduate degrees. All because our culture has instilled the mindset that you have to go to college to get a job. [Read More]

Posted in Publications on Coffee House Writers, Writing

Looking for the Good: A Strategy to Deal with Stress

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My life is overridden with stress right now. Both good and bad. I figured I would let you know what was going on in my life, as a form of catharsis. I hope it will inspire others that they can make it through the hard times, too.

First, I wanted to mention the bad stress because that’s what everyone focuses on. That way, I can end my article with the good. There are good things in everyone’s life. You must look for it. Learning to appreciate the small stuff goes a long way. And it is something I am still trying to learn, but I am getting better at it.

The Bad

To start, I am worried about the rainy season in Florida. The rainy season is from April to October, and it rains heavily every day. Why am I worried about it? Because our house was damaged, and we don’t have the money to fix it. So, every time it rains my room becomes a lake. Water drips through the ceiling at a heavy rate and soaks my stuff and the tile floor, this causes stress. It is easy to slip and fall, and it forces me to sleep in the living room with sheer curtains and windows on either side of me. I don’t like windows because they make me feel exposed. It is because of my schizoaffective disorder and paranoid delusions. If you want to learn more about what life is like with schizoaffective disorder, click here to read my article.

Also, when it rains, the Internet is spotty and rarely works for days. This is frustrating because I go to school online and need a reliable Internet connection to do so. If I stayed in Florida, I wouldn’t have that.

I am trying to move to Ohio. The only problem? None of my family will allow me to stay with them. I am only allowed to stay with them for two weeks but nothing on a semi-permanent basis. Not even my parents’ house.

Because of the lack of support, I have been feeling unwanted and like a burden.

I almost hurt my baby cousin. I lost my balance and nearly fell on top of her, which was more traumatizing for me than it was for her. I was sleep deprived because she woke up and screamed bloody murder at 2 am. I hadn’t been able to sleep before or after that.

I need a job. I have never kept one for more than three months due to stress and my mental illness, so that is another stressor.

My voices get worse with stress, which increases my stress. That makes the voices worse. It’s a vicious cycle that’s hard to break.

The Good

I am in Ohio, currently… [Read more]

Posted in Publications on Functionally Fictional, Writing

“Until Friday Night (The Field Party #1)” By Abbi Glines: A Review

until-friday-night-2
Photo by Cait Marie

There will be a notification when spoilers happen in this review. If you don’t want to find out what happens, stop there.

This book is one of Abbi Glines’ Young Adult fiction novels. Set in Alabama, it is told from two points of view: West Ashby and Maggie Carleton.

West Ashby is the football star running back of the small town’s high school. He has captured the attention from the females and is one of the most popular people at the school. But he is hiding a secret from everyone else, and it is tearing him apart.

Meet Maggie Carleton. Mute by choice due to a horrific scene she witnessed, she is moved to a new high school and a new town to live with her aunt, uncle, and cousin. Her cousin is the quarterback of the football team and is not thrilled to have her there. He is forced to bring her to parties and show her around school, mentioning to everyone that she is off limits and mute.

They meet at a field party (hence the name of the series). West slowly opens up to Maggie, who in turn opens up herself. They become an interesting couple and the talk of the town.

This is a sweet love story for those who want to just have an escape. It is not centered around football, like the title might suggest, but is rather centered around West and Maggie’s love story.

Some parts of it are a bit … [Read More]